Rescued: 105 Kids Forced into Prostitution (FBI raids 76 Cities)


WASHINGTON (AP) —

Authorities rescued 105 children who were forced into prostitution and arrested 150 pimps and others in a three-day law enforcement sweep in 76 American cities, the FBI said Monday. The victims, almost all girls, range in age from 13-17.

The largest numbers of children rescued were in San Francisco, Detroit, Milwaukee, Denver and New Orleans. The campaign, known as Operation Cross Country, was conducted under the FBI’s Innocence Lost initiative.

“Child prostitution remains a persistent threat to children across the country,” Ron Hosko, assistant director of the bureau’s criminal investigative division, told a press conference.

The FBI said the campaign has resulted in rescuing 2,700 children since 2003.

The investigations and convictions of 1,350 have led to life imprisonment for 10 pimps and the seizure of more than $3.1 million in assets.

For the past decade, the FBI has been attacking the problem in partnership with a nonprofit group, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

John Ryan, the head of the center, called the problem “an escalating threat against America’s children.”

The Justice Department has estimated that nearly 450,000 children run away from home each year and that one-third of teens living on the street will be lured toward prostitution within 48 hours of leaving home.

Congress has introduced legislation that would require state law enforcement, foster care and child welfare programs to identify children lured into sex trafficking as victims of abuse and neglect eligible for the appropriate protections and services.

“In much of the country today if a girl is found in the custody of a so-called pimp, she is not considered to be a victim of abuse, and that’s just wrong and defies common sense,” Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said during a Senate Finance Committee hearing last month. Wyden co-sponsored the bill with Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio.

 

Published first at: http://www.wpxi.com/news/news/local/fbi-raids-76-cities-rescue-105-kids-forced-prostit/nY7B8/

 

#31DaysofFreedom

 

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Spoken Word


From the Phoenix Dream Center:

Spoken Word on Sex Trafficking

 

20 Ways YOU Can Help Fight Human Trafficking


The U.S. Department of State has listed on their website 20 ways that you can help fight human trafficking.

After first learning about human trafficking, many people want to help in some way but do not know how. Here are just a few ideas for your consideration.

1. Learn the red flags that may indicate human trafficking and ask follow up questions so that you can help identify a potential trafficking victim. Human trafficking awareness training is available for individuals, businessesfirst responderslaw enforcement, and federal employees.

2. In the United States, call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center at 1-888-3737-888 (24/7) to get help and connect with a service provider in your area, report a tip with information on potential human trafficking activity; or learn more by requesting training, technical assistance, or resources. Call federal law enforcement directly to report suspicious activity and get help from the Department of Homeland Security at 1-866-347-2423 (24/7), or submit a tip online at www.ice.gov/tips, or from the U.S. Department of Justice at 1-888-428-7581 from 9:00am to 5:00pm (EST). Victims, including undocumented individuals, are eligible for services and immigration assistance.

3. Be a conscientious consumer. Discover your Slavery Footprint, and check out the Department of Labor’s List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced LaborEncourage companies, including your own, to take steps to investigate and eliminate slavery and human trafficking in their supply chains and to publish the information for consumer awareness.

4. Incorporate human trafficking information into your professional associations’ conferences, trainings, manuals, and other materials as relevant [example].

5. Join or start a grassroots anti-trafficking coalition.

6. Meet with and/or write to your local, state, and federal government representatives to let them know that you care about combating human trafficking in your community, and ask what they are doing to address human trafficking in your area.

7. Distribute public awareness materials available from the Department of Health and Human Services or Department of Homeland Security.

8. Volunteer to do victim outreach or offer your professional services to a local anti-trafficking organization.

9. Donate funds or needed items to an anti-trafficking organization in your area.

10. Organize a fundraiser and donate the proceeds to an anti-trafficking organization.

11. Host an awareness event to watch and discuss a recent human trafficking documentary. On a larger scale, host a human trafficking film festival.

12. Encourage your local schools to partner with students and include the issue of modern day slavery in their curriculum. As a parent, educator, or school administrator, be aware of how traffickers target school-aged children.

13. Set up a Google alert to receive current human trafficking news.

14. Write a letter to the editor of your local paper about human trafficking in your community.

15. Start or sign a human trafficking petition.

16. Businesses: Provide internships, job skills training, and/or jobs to trafficking survivors. Consumers: Purchase items made by trafficking survivors such as from Jewel Girls or Made by Survivors.

17. Students:Take action on your campus. Join or establish a university or secondary school club to raise awareness about human trafficking and initiate action throughout your local community. Consider doing one of your research papers on a topic concerning human trafficking. Professors: Request that human trafficking be an issue included in university curriculum. Increase scholarship about human trafficking by publishing an article, teaching a class, or hosting a symposium.

18. Law Enforcement Officials: Join or start a local human trafficking task force.

19. Mental Health or Medical Providers: Extend low-cost or free services to human trafficking victims assisted by nearby anti-trafficking organizations. Train your staff on how to identify the indicators of human trafficking and assist victims.

20. Attorneys:Look for signs of human trafficking among your clients. Offer pro-bono services to trafficking victims or anti-trafficking organizations. Learn about and offer to human trafficking victims the legal benefits for which they are eligible. Assist anti-trafficking NGOs with capacity building and legal work.

http://www.state.gov/j/tip/id/help/

 

Today’s challenge: Choose 3 of the above 20 to do in the next week!

No action, no matter how small it may seem, is insignificant. Everything that you do matters. 

Make a difference today!

#31DaysofFreedom

The Rescue Project – Stories From the Streets


#31DaysofFreedom

21 Days of Never-the-Same – Day 21


It has been an interesting blogging journey the last 3 weeks. All of my posts thus far have touched a bit on the ways I have changed over the years or people who have influenced my life etc. But everything all points back to one thing, God.

I wouldn’t be anywhere without Him.

Everything about who I am and where I am all started with Him in the first place.

I realize that I can’t hardly write anything without Him in it. I can hardly have a conversation without Him being a part of it. My life is His. I choose to follow…but he called me first. He loved me first. I am not here on my own accord.

My story started with the call of God.

Without Him, what purpose have I?

12 Not that I have already attained, or am already perfected; but I press on, that I may lay hold of that for which Christ Jesus has also laid hold of me. 13 Brethren, I do not count myself to have apprehended; but one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind and reaching forward to those things which are ahead, 14 I press toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus. Philippians 3:12-14

Because of Him, I endure.

~Brittany

Live. Pursue. Love. Endure.

21 Days of Never-the-Same – Day 19


What you are doing today is important because you are exchanging a day of your life for it.

That alone put things in a real perspective and it really puts into black and white the value of time. We have but one life to live. What kind of legacy will we leave behind?

Most nights before I go to bed I evaluate my day. What did I do of value to the Kingdom today? What was my purpose today?

Did I love the ONE.

Did I live for the moments?

Life is too short to miss out each day’s purpose. Each day holds a divine purpose greater than ourselves and we must keep an ear open to Holy Spirit in order to know what that may be.

What are you exchanging this day for?

In this perspective, what things become insignificant?

21 Days of Never-the-Same – Day 16


Something really big for me is dreams. I am all about dreaming big and I love to be able to help and encourage others to reach their dreams. It is definitely a topic and message that God put in my heart is the art of dreaming well and what it means to dream.

In light of that, there is something new that I learned about dreams lately:

The provision is in the journey.

When God puts a dream in your heart, it is all about saying “yes” to Him and following Holy Spirit’s guidance in timing. Sometimes it will go against all logic. Sometimes the pieces will not all fit together. But dreaming is not all about practicalities. Dreaming is going beyond yourself. It might not seem like everything is coming together for your dream, but that is when you step out in faith.

Philippians 1:6 says:  “And I am sure of this, that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ.”

If God has put a dream in your heart – go for it! Don’t be afraid to believe for the impossible. The provision is in the journey.

I dream of spiritual revival in India.

I dream of being a women’s minister.

I dream of being an author and speaker.

I dream of bringing an end to human trafficking.

Are all of these things practical? No. But they are dreams that are in my heart, and I know that God desires these things for me as well. He will bring this work to completion, but I need to begin to walk it out. It starts with a choice to have faith and step out.

What are your dreams? Do you believe in God’s provision for the journey?

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